New Image: Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

© jmillerphoto.com - Twelve-spotted Skimmer (HDR)

Wow, it has been a while since I’ve been able to say this, but there is a new image in the gallery for sale.  This is image of a Twelve-spotted Skimmer is one of my absolute favorites from my time in Ohio.  It is unfortunate that I waited as long as I did to make it for sale, but I made this image late in the summer as I was getting ready to focus almost exclusively on completing my thesis.  So images for sale went on the back burner.  For a while…

But this is the first image back and it is ready to go.  It is available in sizes up to 11×14 and I can say with confidence that even at that size the image is beautiful.  How?  Because it is hanging on my wall at that size right now.

A little more about this image.  This is my one and only High Dynamic Range (HDR) shot in the gallery right now.  For those unfamiliar with HDR, it is done by combining a minimum of 3 shots done at the same time of the same subject.  One shot is purposely underexposed, one is purposely overexposed, and one is done at the correct exposure.  If it sounds like Goldilocks and the Three Bears, you’re probably not too far off of the mark.  The images are then combined, allowing detail in both the shadows and the highlights to be seen closer to how the human eye could have seen it.  If you own an iPhone 4 or newer, your camera in the phone can do this automatically.

Normally HDR is reserved for landscapes, architecture, flowers, and other reasonably static objects.  Dragonflies are usually far from static.  I was very lucky to get three consecutive shots put together without the creature moving.  The results speak for themselves.

As I said before, this image is now available in the gallery at a very affordable price for Christmas.

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~ by Jim Miller on Friday, 2 December 2011.

3 Responses to “New Image: Twelve-spotted Skimmer”

  1. Beautiful!!

  2. I was counting sixteen spots until I realized that someone’s definition of spot meant that it couldn’t be touching another color.

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